Most medical caregivers are committed to providing a level of care that would not put their patients at risk of suffering personal injury. Unfortunately, errors do occur, and unintentional hospital negligence could have far-reaching consequences. Oregon parents may find it interesting to learn about the impact such an unintentional act had on the life of a young girl and her parents.

As individuals and on behalf of their 7-year-old daughter, a set of parents in another state recently filed a lawsuit against a pediatric clinic. The claim follows an incident in Oct. 2011 and states that the child had to have blood drawn while she was hospitalized at the defending clinic. The laboratory technician who was tasked to do this had allegedly pricked herself accidentally with the needle of the syringe. She then allegedly went ahead and used the same syringe and needle to draw the child's blood. The parents assert that the needle used on their child was contaminated.

According to the plaintiffs, the child is subsequently suffering from an auto-immune disorder that includes conditions such as migraines, arthritis and Reynaud's Disease, along with ethromalalgia vascular disease. They claim that the physicians who have been treating the child have, thus far, not been able to rationalize their daughter's medical condition. The plaintiffs accuse the defendant of medical malpractice, and the plaintiffs are seeking damages valued at an undisclosed amount.

Oregon residents who have been victims of hospital negligence may choose to pursue the recovery of damages incurred. While obtaining evidence to show negligence may not be easy, it will be required when filing a medical malpractice lawsuit in a civil court. Victims may benefit from utilizing the services of an experienced medical malpractice attorney who will have the resources to obtain the necessary evidence and work on obtaining fair compensation.

Source: louisianarecord.com, "Parents sue hospital over illness 7-year-old allegedly contracted from needle stick", Kyle Barnett, Dec. 30, 2014